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04.28.24 "The End of Flirting faith with God" (플러팅 신앙의 결말)


  • "King Solomon loved many foreign women in addition to Pharaoh’s daughter—Moabites, Ammonites, Edomites, Sidonians, and Hittites. They were from nations about which the Lord had told the Israelites, 'You must not intermarry with them, because they will surely turn your hearts after their gods.' Nevertheless, Solomon held fast to them in love. He had seven hundred wives of royal birth and three hundred concubines, and his wives led him astray. As Solomon grew old, his wives turned his heart after other gods, and his heart was not fully devoted to the Lord his God, as the heart of David his father had been." 1 Kings 11:1-4 (NIV)


  • Who was Solomon? He was the third king of Israel, son of King David. He built the temple in Jerusalem and his own palace over 20 years, constructed 20 towns, and fortified his kingdom. He was also a diplomat; nations paid him tribute and silver was as common as stones (1 Kings 10:27). Moreover, Solomon was famously wise, authoring 3,000 proverbs and drawing international visitors seeking his counsel. He was also a prolific artist, composing 1,500 songs.


  • Solomon was an icon of wealth, honor, and wisdom. Yet, he also held another title: an icon of inappropriate relationships. Verse 1: "King Solomon loved many foreign women in addition to Pharaoh’s daughter—Moabites, Ammonites, Edomites, Sidonians, and Hittites."


  • * He was a real Casanova. Imagine managing a thousand wives! The Bible doesn’t specify if Solomon truly loved these women. Marrying foreigners wasn’t the issue—Moses himself married a Cushite woman, and political marriages were common at the time, serving as excellent diplomacy. But God had a deeper reason for forbidding marriage with foreign women.

  • Verse 2: "They were from nations about which the Lord had told the Israelites, 'You must not intermarry with them, because they will surely turn your hearts after their gods.'"

  • * This was a prophecy through Moses, warning against intermarrying with these nations as it would lead the Israelites away from God (Deuteronomy 7:3-4).

  • * Solomon’s relationships became conduits for foreign idols, worldviews, values, and cultures to influence Israel. The story of Solomon begins in 1 Kings 3, with his marriage to Pharaoh’s daughter, leading to 1,000 women over time. Like leaven, sin has a ripple effect, starting small and eventually corrupting wholly.

  • * Let’s consider today’s topic: flirting. Flirtatious people usually seem charming. They casually try to see if others like them back by saying things like, 'if they show interest, they're mine; if not, I'll just move on.' But flirting isn't just for fun; it can start as something playful and turn into a way to use people for personal gain. This behavior is akin to "keeping someone on the hook"—keeping someone interested without committing to a relationship, which often indicates a lack of commitment and responsibility. If you're already in a committed relationship, imagine how hurtful it would be if your partner flirted with others.

  • * Flirting can be compared to "gisaeng-oraebi," a term from traditional Korean culture. Gisaeng were women entertainers who, like geishas in Japan, provided music, song, and dance to entertain wealthy men. Gisaeng-oraebi were people who exploited these entertainers for economic gain, much like a leech. Flirting, in this sense, is using charm not to genuinely engage with someone, but to manipulate for one's own benefit.

  • * Even in our relationship with God, spiritual flirting can occur. The Bible from Genesis shows the Israelites repeatedly leaving God for the world. Solomon’s tale is a story of spiritual flirting. His journey began well, but the seed of sin represented by his foreign wives grew alongside his prosperity.

  • Verses 3,4: "He had seven hundred wives of royal birth and three hundred concubines, and his wives led him astray. As Solomon grew old, his wives turned his heart after other gods, and his heart was not fully devoted to the Lord his God, as the heart of David his father had been."

  • * The Holy Spirit asks us today if we are also flirting with God. Seemingly insignificant sins can grow into major barriers between us and God. We must realign even the slightest deviation back to God. This is what repentance is about:

  • * "For the Lord your God is a jealous God; he will not tolerate your rebellion, and in his anger he will wipe you out from the face of the earth." Deuteronomy 6:15 (NIV)

  • * God’s jealousy is different from envy. It stems from a place of love and a desire for a genuine relationship, not possessiveness.

  • * The love of God is profound and relentless, unlike human love which often fails after betrayal. God never gives up on us:

  • "He remembers his covenant forever, the promise he made, for a thousand generations." Psalm 105:8 (NIV)

  • * We are often like Gomer in the book of Hosea, breaking our promises to God and turning away, only to seek Him when in need. Hosea’s marriage to Gomer represents God’s unwavering love for His wayward people.

  • * Like Gomer, we frequently break our promises to God, turning away from Him and treating our relationship with God as if it were a mere flirtation. We only turn to God when we need Him or after everything else has failed us. In the marketplace, Gomer, used and abandoned, might cry out "buy me, buy me, I will please you." But God declares, "I will redeem you, to free you!" This is the essence of Jesus' love. Jesus paid the ultimate price for us, resolving our debt of sin and choosing freedom for us. We are no longer slaves to sin but children of God, His friends, and co-workers.

  • * This is the gospel. God's love for us is endless, reckless, and relentless. God does not flirt with us; He does not use us merely for His own benefit. Instead, He values us as unique beings, treating us with the inherent worth He has given us. He created the world for eternal fellowship with us.

  • "For I desire mercy, not sacrifice, and acknowledgment of God rather than burnt offerings." Hosea 6:6 (NIV)

  • * God desires our love, not our sacrifices or achievements. He wants a relationship based on genuine affection, not just religious acts. We are everything to God, despite our flaws. Let us respond to His steadfast love with fidelity, not flirtation, fully committing ourselves to Him.

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